VII. 1903-1908 From Paris to Antwerp: a migratory bird on the wing

  • Rembrandt Bugatti in Paris, a witness of his age
  • Draught horses and bear tamers: Marché aux chevaux (R.M. n°43), “Dix minutes de repos”(R.M. n°139) and Montreur d’ours (R.M. n°140)
  • Bugatti and domestic animals: cats and dogs
  • Bugatti and the wild animals of the zoological gardens
    • Loup et louve, l’un contre l’autre (R.M. n°103)
  • Bugatti at the Antwerp Zoo, his open air studio
  • The Cervidae: a fiery spontaneity, the absolute vitality of matter or plastic dynamism
    • Cerf chinois et ses quatre biches (R.M. n°153)
  • Rembrandt Bugatti and Marcello Valsuani
    • Wild goats and mountain sheep
  • Bugatti and his passion for all birds: pelicans, flamingos, storks, marabouts and many others
  • Bugatti compares himself to a Marabou Stork
  • In Montparnasse and the rue Duméril, Rembrandt Bugatti explores the nude
  • “Sculpture is like a woman”. Kathleen Bruce, Dejanice Bugatti and Barbara Bugatti
  • Paris, 1907: L’Ami White at the Alberto Grubicy exhibition
  • Rembrandt Bugatti: ethologist, plasticien and “a narrator of animals’ psychologies”
  • 1908: “Mes antilopes” (R.M. n°216)
  • The other mammals: powerful living architecture
    • Hippopotame bâillant (R.M. n°138)
    • Panthère grognant (R.M. n°208)
    • Lion de l’Atlas (R.M. n°218)
    • Lion couché dévorant (R.M. n°217)
  • The wild animal trade, elephants and jaguars
    • The Elephants
    • The Jaguars

 

 VIII. 1909-1911: Rembrandt Bugatti devotes himself to preparing for important exhibitions or the exhilaration of the creative process

  • Ettore Bugatti’s factory is established in Molsheim, Alsace
  • Rembrandt Bugatti now faces his destiny alone
  • As Rembrandt Bugatti broadens his visual horizons, his sculptural vision is transformed
    • Grand Fourmilier (R.M. n°237)
    • Babouin sacré “hamadryas” (R.M. n°238)
    • Lion et lionne de Nubie (R.M. n°234)
    • Groupe de trois casoars (R.M. n°254)
    • Grand Lion couché (R.M. n°245)
    • Ours brun marchant, patte droite en avant (R.M. n°239) and Yack se léchant l’épaule (R.M. n°248)
  • 1910: The Antwerp Exhibition and the pièce unique
    • Groupe de cinq vieux chevaux (R.M. n°246)
    • Antilopes goudou “La Mère blessée” (R.M. n°270)
  • Bugatti and his fascination for large ruminant mammals
    • Petit Buffle “anoa” (R.M. n°261)
    • Antilope “canna” (R.M. n°244)
    • Zèbre et antilope, joue contre joue (R.M. n°232)
    • Girafe et zébu nain (R.M. n°228)
  • The wild animals become familiar friends
  • The Indian Rhinoceros and the American Bison: already endangered species by the turn of the twentieth century
  • In 1911, A.-A. Hébrard exhibits one hundred Bugatti sculptures, the fruit of eight years of creativity
    • The Axis Deer – stags and does
  • In Paris, members of the European avant-garde revolutionize the art world
  • Penniless and far from his family, Rembrandt Bugatti suffers much hardship
  • Colosse, lutteur olympique or the Übermensch stripped bare (R.M. n°278)

 

IX. 1912–1916: The innovation of the avant-garde is interrupted by the Great War

  • Marchande de pommes (R.M. n°283) and portraits of high society
  • The Belle Époque is a time of contrasts: the avant-garde challenges the establishment
  • Bugatti exhibits his work chez Alberto Grubicy and the Futurists chez Bernheim-Jeune
  • Bugatti is adept at capturing the language of animals; for fifteen years they see eye to eye
  • Bugatti encounters the large birds of prey at the Antwerp Zoo
  • To capture the animal, Rembrandt Bugatti’s vision is at once a precise and complex work of synthesis
  • Panthère à l’affût (R.M. n°315)
  • The condors editioned by Claude Koenig and Rungwe Kingdon
  • The bronzes cast exclusively for Ettore Bugatti
  • As the year 1913 draws to a close, Rembrandt Bugatti writes to a friend: “Now things are beginning to go well.”
  • Tigre royal (R.M. n°316) and Tigre de Sibérie (R.M. n°317)
  • Tigers: a story of imminent extinction.